Combat Human Trafficking — Service Providers and Leaders Toolkit

Trafficking in persons, or human trafficking, is a crime in the United States and globally. The Department of Defense is committed to ending this human rights violation through the Combating Trafficking in Persons program.

Human trafficking includes sex trafficking, forced labor and child soldiering. Though it may seem like these abuses happen only in faraway places, trafficking in persons occurs in the United States as well. The military community can do its part to prevent human trafficking, by:

The first step is learning about Combating Trafficking in Persons. You can explore the resources provided on this page, or visit the program webpage, which provides information, training and resources.

Courses

Take the following courses to learn more about human trafficking:

Joint Knowledge Online provides 24/7 access to the online courses above and more web-based training. You can access these on military classified and unclassified networks. Information on JKO is found at http://jko.jten.smil.mil for classified and http://jko.jten.mil for unclassified access. Direct access to JKO courses is available with a Common Access Card or login and password by going directly to https://jkodirect.jten.mil or http://jkolms.jten.smil.mil.

You can self-register for a JKO account if you have a CAC. If you don’t have a CAC but have a government or military email account (ending in .mil, .gov, nps.edu, or dodea.edu), you may obtain a login and password account. If you do not have a CAC or government or military email account, you may request a sponsored account. You can find a link to request the sponsored account on the JKO login page.

Resources

Check out the following resources to learn more about human trafficking, including DOD official policy:

Contacts

If you see or suspect trafficking in persons, report it.

Family Advocacy Program Department of Defense Legislation

Military programs are governed by federal law, Department of Defense policy and additional policies specific to the branches of service. Below are the excerpts from federal law that govern child abuse prevention programs in the military.

Public Law 108-136, “National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004,” §572 and 573, November 24, 2003 Under Section 527 of this legislation, payments made under the Transitional Compensation Program can begin earlier and the duration of payments is more clearly defined. Section 573 allows the secretaries of the military departments to authorize transitional compensation benefits for individuals who would not otherwise be eligible.

Title 37 United States Code (USC) §476(a), “Travel and Transportation Allowances: Dependents; Baggage and Household Effects,” January 3, 2012 Under this law, the abused spouse or parent of an abused child wishing to relocate for personal safety reasons may request shipment of household goods and a personal auto if he or she wants to leave the abusive parent or spouse. This benefit is designed to assist abused spouses or parents of abused children who need to move away from the abuser for safety reasons.

Title 10 USC §1787, “Reporting of Child Abuse,” January 3, 2012 This is the federal child abuse reporting law, outlining who is required to report suspicions of child abuse to the appropriate authorities. State statutes governing the reporting of child abuse are generally applicable to personnel on military installations as well.

Title 18 USC §922(d)(9) and (g)(9), “Unlawful Acts,” January 3, 2012 This legislation amends the Gun Control Act of 1968 and has provisions making it a felony for anyone convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence to possess a firearm.

Family Advocacy Program Department of Defense Policies

These resources include Department of Defense directives, instructions and guidance on family advocacy and child abuse issues.

DoD Directive 6400.01, “Family Advocacy Program,” July 22, 2019: This instruction establishes the Family Advocacy Program and assigns responsibilities for working to prevent family violence, identifying victims of abuse, assessing families experiencing domestic and child abuse, and providing treatment for those families.

DoD Instruction 6400.5, “New parent Support Program (NPSP),” June 13, 2012: This instruction implements policy, assigns responsibilities, and prescribes procedures under DoD Directive 6400.1 for the NPSP, a standardized secondary prevention program for parents who are at risk for engaging in child abuse. The NPSP uses an intensive, voluntary home visitation model developed specifically for expectant parents and parents of children from birth to 3 years of age to reduce the risk of child abuse.

DoD Instruction 6400.06, “Domestic Abuse Involving DoD Military and Certain Affiliated Personnel,” August 21, 2007, Incorporating Change 2, July 9, 2015: This instruction establishes, implements, updates domestic abuse policies, and identifies and assigns responsibilities for preventing and responding to domestic abuse. It includes provisions related to military protections orders, Fatality Review and other topics that are relevant in child abuse cases. Enclosures 4 and 5 of this policy also contain sample memorandums of understanding for criminal investigative and law enforcement organizations, and legal officials.

DoD 6400.01, “Family Advocacy Program” April 5, 2017: This manual prescribes uniform standards for all installation Family Advocacy Programs and provides installation FAP officers with an instrument for executing their programs.

Victim Advocate Safety Plan, DD Form 2893, March 1, 2005: This safety plan template is to be used to assist victims of domestic abuse to plan for increased safety and to prepare in advance for the possibility of further abuse or violence.

DoD Instruction 6400.03, “Family Advocacy Command Assistance Team (FACAT),” April 25, 2014: This instruction establishes policy, assigns responsibility, and prescribes procedures for implementation of the Family Advocacy Command Assistance Team. The FACAT helps local installation personnel in managing a case of child sexual abuse in a DoD out-of-home care program when multiple children are identified as actual or potential victims.

DoD Instruction 1402.05, “Criminal History Background Checks on Individuals in Child Care Services,” September 11, 2015: This instruction establishes policy, assigns responsibility and prescribes procedures for criminal history background checks for all existing and newly hired individuals involved in the provision of child care services as federal employees or contractors or in federal facilities to children under the age of 18.

DoD Instruction 1342.24, “Transitional Compensation for Abused Dependents,” May 23, 1995, Incorporating Change 1, January 16, 1997: This instruction implements policy, assigns responsibilities and prescribes procedures for payment of monthly transitional compensation to dependents of members separated from military service for dependent abuse.

Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness (USD (P&R)) Memorandum, “Duration of Payment for Transitional Compensation for Abused Dependents,” June 14, 2004: This directive type memorandum implements changes to the Transitional Compensation Program mandated by congressional legislation.

Exceptional Family Member Program Service Regulations and Orders

Army

Army Regulation (AR) 600-8-14, “Identification Cards for Member of the Uniformed Services, their Eligible Family Members and other Eligible Personnel,” August 4, 2017 This regulation provides guidance on the receipt of ID Cards for dependent children who become incapacitated prior to age twenty-one, are incapable of self-support and remain entitled to benefits and privileges authorized by the Uniformed Services, if medical sufficiency is met and the sponsor is providing over 50 percent of their support.

AR 600-20, “Army Command Policy,” April 27, 2010 This regulation prescribes the policy and responsibility of command, which includes well-being of the force, military and personal discipline and conduct, the Army Equal Opportunity Program, prevention of sexual harassment, and the Army Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program. Paragraph 5-5 of the regulation contains guidance regarding family care plans.

AR 608-75, “Exceptional Family Member Program,” January 27, 2017 This regulation outlines the policies and procedures for the Exceptional Family Member Program in the Army.

Marine Corps

Marine Corps Order (MCO) P1000.6G, “Assignment, Classification, and Travel Systems Manual (ACTS Manual), May 6, 1999 This manual provides policy and guidance for the classification, distribution, assignment and transfer of officers and enlisted personnel and their dependents.

MCO P1300.8R, “Marine Corps Personnel Assignment Policy”, October 4, 1994 This manual provides guidance on the assignment and permanent change of station transfers and policy for overseas movement of Marines.

MCO 1740.13B, “Family Care Plans”, March 26, 2012 This order publishes policy and establishes procedures for family care plans of Marines and other emergency essential civilian personnel who are single parents; dual military couples with dependents; Marines who otherwise bear sole responsibility for the care of children under the age of nineteen; or Marines with family members who are unable to care for themselves in the Marine’s absence.

MCO P1754.4C, “Exceptional Family Member Program”, October 8, 2020 This order disseminates policy and assigns responsibilities for the Marine Corps Exceptional Family Member Program.

MCO P5512.11D, “Identification Cards for Member of the Uniformed Services, their Eligible Family Members and other Eligible Personnel,” June 17, 2009 This order provides guidance on the receipt of ID Cards for dependent children who become incapacitated prior to age twenty-one, are incapable of self-support, and remain entitled to benefits and privileges authorized by the Uniformed Services, if medical sufficiency is met and the sponsor is providing over 50 percent of their support.

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) Instruction 1300.14D, “Suitability Screening for Overseas and Remote Duty Assignment,” April 9, 2007 This instruction publishes Navy policy and guidance for determining suitability of Navy personnel and family members for overseas or remote duty assignments.

OPNAV Instruction 1754.2D, “Exceptional Family Member (EFM) Program,” November 3, 2010 This instruction issues Navy policy and guidance for identifying sponsors who have Exceptional Family Members with special medical, psychological, or special educational needs.

OPNAV Instruction 1740.4E, “US Navy Family Care Policy,” October 5, 2017 This instruction is designed to assist members in developing executable family care plans and establish procedural requirements.

Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Instruction 1754.5C, “Exceptional Family Member Program”, April 12, 2019 This instruction provides policy, procedures and assigns responsibilities for the Exceptional Family Member Program and applies to all units in the Navy and Marine Corps.

Bureau of Naval Personnel (BUPERS) Instruction 1750.10C, “Identification Cards for Member of the Uniformed Services, their Eligible Family Members and other Eligible Personnel,” June 17, 2009 This instruction provides guidance on the receipt of ID Cards for dependent children who become incapacitated prior to age twenty-one, are incapable of self-support, and remain entitled to benefits and privileges authorized by the Uniformed Services, if medical sufficiency is met and the sponsor is providing over 50 percent of their support.

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) Instruction 1300.2A, “Suitability Screening, Medical Assignment Screening and Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) Identification and Enrollment,” June 23, 2006 This instruction provides guidance, procedures and responsibilities for the Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) enrollment, the Central Screening Committees, and EFMP managers. The medical, dental, and educational Suitability Screening checklists and worksheets for overseas assignments are also contained in this instruction.

BUMED Instruction 1755.1a, “Educational and Developmental Intervention Services (EDIS) Early Intervention Services (EIS),” July 3, 2018 This instruction assigns responsibilities and provides guidance and procedures specific to the provision of EIS by Navy EDIS programs.

Navy

OPNAV Instruction 1300.14D, “Suitability Screening for Overseas and Remote Duty Assignment,” April 9, 2007 This instruction publishes Navy policy and guidance for determining suitability of Navy personnel and family members for overseas or remote duty assignments.

OPNAV Instruction 1754.2D, “Exceptional Family Member (EFM) Program,” November 3, 2010 This instruction issues Navy policy and guidance for identifying sponsors who have Exceptional Family Members with special medical, psychological, or special educational needs.

OPNAV Instruction 1740.4D, “US Navy Family Care Policy,” October 27, 2009 This instruction is designed to assist members in developing executable family care plans and establish procedural requirements.

BUPERS Instruction 1750.10C, “Identification Cards for Member of the Uniformed Services, their Eligible Family Members and other Eligible Personnel,” June 17, 2009 This instruction provides guidance on the receipt of ID Cards for dependent children who become incapacitated prior to age twenty-one, are incapable of self-support, and remain entitled to benefits and privileges authorized by the Uniformed Services, if medical sufficiency is met and the sponsor is providing over 50 percent of their support.

BUMED Instruction 1300.3A, “Suitability Screening for Individuals Nominated for Individual Augmentee and Support Assignments to Overseas Contingency Operations and Specific Temporary Additional Duty Assignments,” July 6, 2010 This instruction provides guidance, procedures and responsibilities for the Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) enrollment, the Central Screening Committees, and EFMP managers. The medical, dental, and educational Suitability Screening checklists and worksheets for overseas assignments are also contained in this instruction.

BUMED Instruction 1755.1, “Educational and Developmental Intervention Services (EDIS) Early Intervention Services (EIS),” October 17, 2005 This instruction assigns responsibilities and provides guidance and procedures specific to the provision of EIS by Navy EDIS programs.

BUMED Instruction 1755.2, “Educational and Developmental Intervention Services (EDIS),” October 5, 2005 This instruction outlines polices and responsibilities for EDIS within the Department of the Navy.

Air Force

Air Force Instruction (AFI) 36-2908, “Family Care Plans,” October 1, 2000 incorporating Change 1 as of August 18, 2010 This instruction establishes responsibilities and outlines procedures governing family care plans for Air Force personnel.

AFI 36-3026(IP), “Identification Cards for Member of the Uniformed Services, their Eligible Family Members and other Eligible Personnel,” August 4, 2017 This instruction provides guidance on the receipt of ID Cards for dependent children who become incapacitated prior to age twenty-one, are incapable of self-support, and remain entitled to benefits and privileges authorized by the Uniformed Services, if medical sufficiency is met and the sponsor is providing over 50 percent of their support.

Air Force Policy Directive (AFPD) 40-6, “Educational and Developmental Intervention Services,” July 31, 2018 This directive establishes policies that the Air Force Educational and Developmental Intervention Services (EDIS) will use to ensure the highest standards of practice and care are applied to all aspects of intervention for eligible children with disabilities and their families.

AFPD 40-7, “Medical Support to Family Member Relocation and Exceptional Family Member Program-Medical,” May 9, 2018 This directive establishes policies for the Air Force Special Needs Identification and Assignment Coordination (SNIAC) process.

AFI 40-701, “Medical Support to Family Member Relocation and Exceptional Family Member Program,” November 19, 2014 This instruction describes the responsibilities of Air Force personnel with regard to the SNIAC process, in Military Treatment Facilities (MTFs), the Air Force Personnel Center (AFPC), and in other agencies that are instrumental to the implementation and operation of the Air Force SNIAC process.

Coast Guard

Commandant Instruction (COMDINST) 1754.7C, “Coast Guard Special Needs Program,” April 9, 2020 This instruction provides policy and guidance concerning the Coast Guard Special Needs Program.

COMDINST 1752.1, “Family Advocacy Program (FAP),” August 14, 2014 This instruction establishes policy and procedures for managing family advocacy and special needs cases within the Coast Guard. Special needs cases include family members with diagnosed long-term medical, physical, psychological, educational, and/or mental conditions.

COMDINST M5512.1A, “Identification Cards for Member of the Uniformed Services, their Eligible Family Members and other Eligible Personnel,” January 8, 2010 This manual promulgates inter-Service policy supporting the preparation, issuance, use, accounting for, and disposal of identification cards issued by the Uniformed Services.

A Safe Space for Relationship Help: The Family Advocacy Program

Young woman thinking

It’s important to know where you can go for safe, judgment-free help when you are feeling unsafe in your relationship. Caring assistance is available through the Family Advocacy Program.

Everyone who experiences domestic abuse has a unique set of circumstances and concerns. Through your installation’s Family Advocacy Program, you can meet with a victim advocate with a deep understanding about the challenges of seeking help for domestic abuse. The role of a victim advocate is to be there for you, to hear you and to offer help and resources.

Find Support Today

Take care of yourself today by talking with a victim advocate, who can show you options you might not be aware of and provide the support you are seeking.

You’ll talk, we’ll listen

When you call (or visit) your Family Advocacy Program to reach a victim advocate, they will welcome you in.

Connect with a victim advocate through your local FAP office. You can decide how much of your story to share in the first conversation.

When you call to speak with a victim advocate, they will want to know if you are in a safe place to talk, and can discuss ways for you to maintain your safety as you seek information and support for your situation.

To help, your advocate will need to know what you’ve experienced. They will listen to you without judgment to find out what you have been through and what you want to happen going forward.

It may be difficult to talk about what you’ve experienced, but it will allow you to voice concerns about your relationship in a safe space. It may help to start by explaining a recent event or by talking about your experiences in a timeline of your relationship.

You have options, and we’ll explain them

The Family Advocacy Program offers victim-centered and victim-led assistance. Translation? Your victim advocate will never pressure you to make a decision you are uncomfortable with. You are in charge of your life and your choices.

You don’t have to be experiencing a crisis to meet with a victim advocate — they can support you regardless of what stage you are at in your relationship. It is never too early to reach out to a victim advocate to ask questions and learn what help is available.

Make sure to tell your advocate what steps you’re ready to take, so they can provide informed support. By understanding your specific situation, your victim advocate will get a better idea of how they can help. They will explain the options you have for reporting and support, after which you can choose what is best for you and your family.

If you decide to report domestic abuse, there are two military reporting options: restricted and unrestricted. Your victim advocate can explain these options in specific detail according to your situation. They can walk you through what each option would look like for you and your family to help you understand the difference and decide what works best for you.

You choose your path, we’ll provide the resources

Victims of domestic abuse come from different family situations and have different experiences and needs. Some may choose to stay in the relationship and try to work things out. Others may choose to leave the relationship. Whatever path you choose, your FAP victim advocate will provide you with the support you need.

Develop a relationship with your victim advocate

Remember that when you connect with your victim advocate, it doesn’t have to be a one-time conversation. They are there as long as you need them to help you find safety, support and healing. Through the Family Advocacy Program, your advocate will work with you to:

  • Promote your safety, well-being and choices
  • Access appropriate treatment for you and other affected family members
  • Identify and build on your and your family’s strengths
  • Increase protective factors to help reduce your risk of future abuse
  • Connect with civilian resources and domestic violence programs

Specifically, your FAP advocate can facilitate connections for you to receive assistance for things like finding immediate lodging, medical care, legal counsel, a job or a new home.

As you continue to meet with your victim advocate, ask them questions you may have forgotten about on your first visit. Let them know your concerns and fears so they can address those, too. Your advocate can work with you to create a plan for your future.

Think of talking to your victim advocate as you would talking to a friend, only a friend who is removed from your situation and who has expertise in your area of need.

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic abuse, contact the Family Advocacy Program to learn about your options and the resources available to you. You can also contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline. If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, call 911.