Staying Healthy During COVID-19

Service member with face mask

Current as of July 12, 2021


It’s normal to cut corners when engaging in everyday activities, especially when you’re comfortable with the task. But to avoid putting yourself and your family at risk during coronavirus disease 2019, examine your habits to make sure you’re not cutting corners on your health.

Perhaps the most important factor when it comes to your habits during this time is to avoid spreading germs.

Keep calm with COVID Coach

This app can help you cope with pandemic-related stress. It’s free, secure and recommended by the Department of Defense.

For specific guidance on everything from vaccinations and personal hygiene to keeping your home clean and avoiding contact with others, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a great resource.

But maintaining good health during the COVID-19 pandemic means getting vaccinated, following guidance for covering your face in public and considering paying extra attention to your eating habits, exercise and personal schedule.

With that in mind, here are some things to consider:

Get vaccinated against COVID-19

The CDC has recommended everyone ages 12 and older get a COVID-19 vaccine. Here’s why:

  • Getting vaccinated is the best way to protect yourself, your loved ones and your community. The vaccine works with your immune system so it will be ready to fight the virus if you’re exposed. If you do get COVID-19, the vaccine will help you from getting seriously ill.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are safe. Each of the available vaccines for COVID-19 were developed using science that has been around for decades. The vaccines went through all the required stages of clinical trials and have been shown to be safe and effective. Additionally, COVID-19 vaccines have received and continue to undergo the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history.
  • The vaccine is a key tool to help stop the pandemic. When enough people are vaccinated, it becomes harder for COVID-19 to spread from person to person. This protects the entire population, including those who cannot be vaccinated, like newborns and those who are allergic to the vaccine.
  • The vaccine is a safe way to build immunity without getting sick. People who recover after being sick with COVID-19 have natural immunity to the disease. However, it’s not clear how long that protection lasts. The CDC recommends the vaccine even for those who have been sick with COVID-19.
  • You can resume many activities once fully vaccinated. It takes your body two weeks after being vaccinated to develop the antibodies that fight COVID-19. Once you are fully vaccinated, you can go out in public without a mask or having to social distance except where required by law or regulations.

Visit the TRICARE website to schedule a vaccination appointment or use the Defense Health Agency’s Appointing Portal to book your appointment at a DOD COVID-19 vaccination site.

Wear cloth face coverings if you are not vaccinated

The Department of Defense requires unvaccinated personnel to wear face coverings and to social distance while on the installation and during official duties outside the home. All DOD personnel should continue to comply with CDC guidance regarding areas where masks should be worn, including within airports.

These practices can slow the spread of the virus and help people who may unknowingly have it from transmitting it to others. The CDC recommends masks for unvaccinated adults and children ages 2 and up that:

  • Are non-medical and disposable
  • Are made with breathable or tightly-woven fabric
  • Have two or three layers
  • Include a filter pocket

The DOD does not authorize the use of novelty masks, masks with ventilation valves or face shields.

Be careful not to touch your eyes, nose or mouth when removing your face covering. Wash your hands as soon as you finish.

Be good to your body

Keep yourself healthy with the following activities:

  • Get moving. Reach out to a Military OneSource health and wellness coach to develop an exercise plan just for you with the equipment you have at home. You can make an appointment for a phone, online or video session by calling Military OneSource at 800-342-9647. OCONUS/International? Click here for calling options.
  • Keep your bedtime the same. It’s tempting to binge watch your favorite shows late into the night if you are not currently reporting to work or if you are working from home, but resist that urge. Sleep helps restore and relax your mind and body. A good sleep routine keeps you healthy.
  • Eat regular, nutritious meals with your family. Teach your children how to stay healthy by choosing healthy meals. Show them how to plan a meal, cook it, set the table and clean up after. Family meals are a great time to bond and get to know each other better, not to mention staying healthy.
  • Order medications online. Order your medications online to avoid contact with people who may have the virus. Here’s how to get home delivery for medications under TRICARE.

Be kind to your mind

Mental health is just as important as physical health. Here are a few ways to stay informed with updates on safety while keeping current events in perspective.

  • Engage your mind in your favorite activities. Schedule time for yourself to participate in the activities you enjoy the most. Whatever your thing is — reading a book, painting, playing an instrument or streaming your favorite music, dancing, writing, singing, etc. — do it, enjoy it and you’ll feel better for it.
  • Avoid information overload. Watching or reading too much negative news can increase anxiety. Instead, limit the time you take in negative news and use the extra time to fill yourself with something positive like writing down all you are grateful for or using these other tips for emotional wellness.
  • Practice self-care. Plug into tools to help you de-stress and take care of yourself. The Defense Health Agency recommends several: Chill Drills is a collection of free simple audio exercises to help you de-stress while Breathe2Relax trains you on deep-breathing techniques. They are among several you’ll find on the Military OneSource Recommended Wellness Apps page. The Military Meditation Coach podcast provides relaxation exercises and tips for well-being.
  • Help others. Helping others will bring you happiness. Consider surprising a neighbor by doing their yard work or leaving groceries on their porch (while keeping your social distance).
  • Ask for help if you or your family need it.  Military OneSource confidential, non-medical counselors are here for you. Check out Address That Stress to learn how non-medical counseling works and all the ways it can help you. If you or a family member are having suicidal thoughts, call the Military Crisis line at 800-273-8255, press 1; text to 838255; or start a confidential chat. If you find yourself in a dangerous, abusive situation, contact command, the Family Advocacy Program or law enforcement. If you or someone else is in immediate danger, call 911. Except in select circumstances, you have the option of making either a restricted or unrestricted report of domestic abuse. Both options allow access to victim advocacy services, which include personal help and support.
  • Seek reliable information. Look for sites that provide factual and frequently-updated information such as the CDC.

Stay up to date on all the latest information on COVID-19. For Department of Defense updates for the military community regarding the virus that causes COVID-19, view the following sites:

Family Fitness With Young Children

Family fitness

As a parent of young children, your time may not always feel like your own. Despite your best efforts, it may seem like there’s always another mess to clean up. Finding time to exercise … well, let’s just say it might not make it to the top of your to-do list.

But here’s the thing: You don’t have to choose between spending time with your children and physical fitness. Regardless of your current fitness level, there are ways to include your family in your active lifestyle, which ultimately sets a positive, healthy example for your kids.

Try these ideas for exercising if you have young children.

Fitness with a baby

  • Put your baby in a stroller and take a brisk walk. You’ll get some exercise, your child will enjoy a change of scenery and you’ll both get some fresh air.
  • Invest in a jogging stroller. Once your child is old enough, a jogging stroller is a great way to pick up the pace and improve your cardiovascular fitness.
  • Check out upcoming walks, fun runs or races. See if your community or MWR program offers a stroller-friendly option.
  • Hike with a baby carrier. There are numerous options on the market that allow you to safely strap your child to your chest or back so you can enjoy a hike.
  • Look for a parent and baby fitness class. Check with your installation’s fitness center to see if it offers classes designed for parents with young children.

Fitness with a toddler or young child

  • Take a trip to the park. Visit the playground on your installation or find a park in your surrounding community where you and your child can run, climb, swing and jump.
  • Go for a bike ride. Attach a child’s seat to your bike and get ready for a good time. Make sure you have the proper safety equipment (such as a helmet for each of you) before you set out.
  • Rent sports equipment. Check with MWR on your installation to see what equipment is available if you aren’t yet sure of your child’s interests. This is a way to introduce your child to a wide range of sporting options without spending a lot.
  • Go bowling. Not only does bowling provide a great way to be active together, but your installation’s bowling center may even offer a family discount.
  • Go for a swim. Spend an afternoon splashing around with your child and teaching them swimming basics, such as floating and treading water. You can even check with MWR about swimming lessons.
  • Have a dance party. Fitness doesn’t have to be a formal activity to be good for your body. Turn on some music and have a family dance party at home.

Remember, every little bit of activity counts — whether it’s doing jumping jacks during television commercial breaks or playing a game of tag with your children in the backyard. Use whatever time and equipment you have at your disposal to prioritize your fitness while still spending time with your family. Not only will your family’s health improve, but your children will learn healthy habits that can last a lifetime.

Check with MWR on your installation for a schedule of swimming lessons, or reach out to Health and Wellness Coaching for other ideas for family fitness activities.

Fitness Classes With Morale, Welfare and Recreation

Kickbox class

From high-intensity aerobic workouts to relaxing yoga, your installation’s fitness center has classes for everyone at every level. Classes are available for little or no cost to anyone who can access the gym through the Morale, Welfare and Recreation program. Use the classes as primary fitness tools or supplement your current routine. Bring the family and make fitness a fun habit. If you’re hesitant or unsure that group fitness is right for you, consider what you could get out of the classes:

  • Team atmosphere — Participating in a group fitness class gets you in a room with similarly motivated people. In the classes, you may be able to help a classmate reach a fitness goal or learn a new skill, while challenging yourself to keep pace with a more advanced classmate. Often, the atmosphere is enthusiastic and supportive, which can help you take on new challenges and celebrate success. Plus, you benefit from the motivation of a dedicated instructor. And if you’re taking the class as a family, you’ve got a ready-made team.
  • Accountability — Just the act of signing up for a class is often enough to create a sense of accountability, which will likely grow as you get to know your instructor and your classmates. When you find a class that fits your needs, you can hold your classmates accountable for missing classes, and they might do the same for you.
  • New exercises — Trying a new group fitness class might be just what you’ve been looking for to break out of your everyday routine. If you’re searching for a completely new workout or simply a few fresh exercises, you can benefit from the installation fitness instructors who create challenging workouts to re-energize you. Try something new and you might discover a new favorite workout.
  • Workout partner — If you’re just beginning your fitness journey, a workout partner can help you reach your goals. You may find others who are working toward similar lifestyle changes, such as increasing exercise, kicking unhealthy habits, losing weight or starting a healthier diet. You can motivate each other and offer support along the way. And if you are working out with your family, you can motivate one another before, during and after a class.

Check out the group fitness schedule for your installation’s fitness center and join a class today.

Healthy Living – Resources

As a military member, you have several resources available to support your health — from nutrition courses and fitness initiatives to military family programs and wellness centers. Discover and explore different tools that can help make healthy living easier for you and your family. While Military OneSource does not provide direct health care services, it does offer non-medical counseling and information about health care services and resources.

Nutrition resources

Good health begins with proper nutrition. The following tools and programs can help you eat right, whether you are at home or at a dining facility.

  • MyPlate.gov: This website is rich with healthy eating tips, recipes, and printable posters, placemats and activity sheets to use at home and offers information for all life stages, from infants and toddlers to teens and older adults. Whether you’re looking for help with healthy eating, a picky eater or creating a customized healthy cookbook for your family, MyPlate can help. The Start Simple with MyPlate app is also available to help you select simple daily food goals that will lead to a healthier diet and lifestyle.
  • National Farmers Market Directory: The fresher your produce, the more nutrition it offers. Local farmers’ markets give service members and their families the healthier option of acquiring locally grown produce. Whether it’s just a roadside stand or a gathering place for local producers, these farmers markets will help you build a better diet.
  • Health.gov: This website offers every day healthy living and nutrition information.
  • Dietary Guidelines for 2020-2025: Updated, downloadable and printable dietary guidelines are available to help set the path for a healthier future for the entire family.
  • Commissaries.com: A great resource for eating healthy on a budget is the military commissary, which sells groceries and household goods at an average of 30% less than other markets and stores. Before your grocery run, visit the commissary website, a great network of information where you can:
    • Snag simple, healthy recipes for your meal planning or last-minute meal. Narrow your recipe search by selecting Dietitian Approved under the Browse Recipes section.
    • Review the Savings Aisle to see what’s on sale for the week and preview the promotional prices before making your shopping list.
    • Make your shopping list or order online with curbside pickup by using the My Shopping List

Fitness resources

Among the fitness resources available to service members and their families are these:

  • The President’s Council on Sports, Fitness and Nutrition: This program engages, educates and empowers all Americans to adopt healthy lifestyles, including regular physical activity and good nutrition. The council is made up of athletes, chefs, physicians, fitness professionals and educators who are appointed by the president to serve in an advisory capacity through the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Valuable content includes physical activity and fitness resources for all ages and military-specific resources including Move! Weight Management Program and service-specific fitness programs.
  • Human Performance Resource Center: This optimization website is for U.S. warfighters, their families and those who support them. The goal is total force fitness: warfighters optimized to carry out their mission as safely and effectively as possible.
  • Health.gov: Fitness and physical activity information and resources are available, including the Move Your Way® Campaign.
  • Total Force Fitness: mil’s Total Force Fitness concept focuses on a service member’s entire health throughout their career.

Family health resources

Service members can take advantage of a variety of resources that support a healthy family life, tools that help teach youth good nutrition and information on the importance of exercise. Some of them include:

  • The President’s Council on Sports, Fitness and Nutrition: This program engages, educates and empowers all Americans to adopt healthy lifestyles, including regular physical activity and good nutrition. The council is made up of athletes, chefs, physicians, fitness professionals and educators who are appointed by the president to serve in an advisory capacity through the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Valuable content includes:
  • MyPlate.gov: This website offers healthy eating tips, recipes and printable posters, placemats and activity sheets to use at home and offers information for all life stages, from infants and toddlers to teens and older adults. Whether you’re looking for help with healthy eating, a picky eater or creating a customized healthy cookbook for your family, MyPlate has information to help. Explore MyPlate Life Stages for nutrition resources for children of all ages.
  • Dietary Guidelines for 2020-2025: Updated, downloadable and printable dietary guidelines are available to help set the path for a healthier future for the entire family.
  • We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity and Nutrition): This national movement, developed by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, is designed to give parents, caregivers and entire communities a way to help children ages 8-13 stay at a healthy weight. A wealth of information — including healthy weight basics, eating right, getting active and downloadable cookbooks — can be used for the entire family!
  • Your Local Commissary offers tips on making healthy choices and raising a healthy eater.

Wellness resources

  • Health and Wellness Coaching Consultation: The nutrition and overall health of our service members and their families is important to our nation’s defense. Check out this free resource from Military OneSource for eligible service members and family members and get your overall wellness back on track.
  • Military OneSource Recommended Wellness Apps: Check out the recommended apps from Military OneSource to get your health and wellness back on track.

Online health and wellness initiatives

Health services are available to military members in a variety of forms. Get motivated by connecting with other people who have similar goals and seek out new methods for helping yourself stay on the path toward a healthy lifestyle with these online initiatives.

  • The Human Performance Resource Center is a Department of Defense initiative that helps members of the military, their families and caretakers to maintain a fit and healthy lifestyle. The online center offers advice on nutrition, dietary supplements, physical conditioning and mental fitness.
  • TRICARE provides resources to help you pursue a healthy lifestyle, such as Making Healthy Changes for Life.
  • The U.S. Department of Agriculture offers the Start Simple with MyPlate app, a simple and easy-to-use mobile app that allows you to set daily food goals, track your progress in real time, earn badges and celebrate your success as you learn to develop healthy eating habits.

MWR Digital Library health resources

Another great place to turn to support your health is the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Digital Library, which offers a variety of materials for those seeking information on wellness. Through the library, users can:

  • Access medical journals, magazines, reference works and multimedia covering a range of health-related issues.
  • Find journals and other materials with information on everything from brain health to psychology to alternative medicine.
  • Improve their brain health with clinically proven personalized brain training exercises.

Fitness, Nutrition and Active Living – The Essentials

american flag

Optimal health begins with nutrition, fitness and active living. From guidelines on developing healthy eating habits and ideas on how to stay fit to strategies for giving your child a happy, healthy start, Military OneSource provides practical and fresh content as well as initiatives and programs that will motivate you to maintain healthy living and manage your health in creative ways. Now, more than ever, it is important to incorporate healthy daily practices into your complex schedules to help promote physical, mental and emotional wellness for all.

Practice good nutrition

Healthy eating requires developing new diet habits like limiting sugar, snacking on fruits and vegetables and choosing whole grains. Get your child’s day off to a good start with a breakfast high in protein and whole grains and keep healthy snacks available throughout the day. Aim for five servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Your local farmers market and military commissary are two great places to buy fresh produce at reasonable prices.

My MilLife Guide is a great way to keep your family’s health goals on target. When you sign up for My MilLife Guide as a service member or a military spouse, expert content pertaining to your goals will be delivered right to your mobile device.

You can also sign up for Military OneSource health and wellness coaching sessions. This service is free for service members and their immediate family. Consultants can help you with weight management, fitness, nutrition, stress management and more. Sign up today. Call Military OneSource at 800-342-9647. OCONUS? Click here for international dialing options or schedule a live chat.

Turn to Military OneSource for other helpful strategies on eating right.

Relevant Articles:

Relevant Resources:

Help your child create a balanced, healthy day from start to finish

It’s important to teach children as early as possible actions and choices that promote health and happiness. Start by encouraging good nutrition and feeding them a hearty breakfast every morning, ensure healthy snacks are available throughout the day — at home and school — and be sure to take breaks to keep the body moving, whether it’s a family walk around the block or a quick game to get the blood pumping. Encourage physical activity at the end of the day as much as possible to lessen additional screen time. Promote good sleep habits and teach them how to communicate and express their feelings.

Here are some family activities to stay active and stay connected:

  • Engage in a backyard relay
  • Play a game of Duck, Duck, Goose
  • Act out your favorite story book character
  • Plan a backyard picnic or camping night
  • Read bedtime stories together
  • Draw your favorite movie character
  • Host a family game night
  • Have a family movie night with healthy movie-themed snacks
  • Eat dinner under the stars
  • Have a family bake-a-thon and host it virtually if all of your loved ones aren’t together

Relevant Articles:

Relevant Resources:

Improve family fitness

Make fitness and active living an important part of your family life. Swap some of your daily screen time for a stroll around the neighborhood with your children, a short bike ride, a game of kickball, a Frisbee toss in the backyard or hop scotch. Start the day with morning stretches or beginner yoga and sprinkle in movement breaks throughout the day. Get creative and have fun! Plant or weed a garden, wash the car, walk the dog, play freeze tag, rake leaves or pick up sticks. Your installation’s Morale, Welfare and Recreation is a great resource to get the entire family moving – with fitness classes, sports teams, golf courses, outdoor recreation programs and more.

Relevant Articles:

Relevant Resources:

Access nutrition and fitness resources

Don’t be afraid to tap into the support you need to meet your nutrition and fitness goals. Military OneSource provides health and wellness coaching sessions to help you eat better, get in shape, manage stress and tackle transitions. We highlight a wide range of nutrition and fitness resources, tools and programs that will motivate you on the path to healthy living.

A new text-based service from the Military Health System and Military OneSource can help you get back on track. My MilLife Guide is like having a portable health and wellness coach who will regularly send you texts, or “GuideTips,” to support you as you take care of yourself and your family. These texts will lead you to proven resources developed for the military community.

Relevant Articles:

Relevant Resources:

Healthy habits for remote learning and work

At the forefront of parental concern is how to focus on good nutrition and activity habits in a world of remote learning and remote socializing. As parents, it’s important to focus on the key principles of setting your child up for mental, physical and emotional well-being. Model the behavior you’d like to see in your child and set a daily schedule that’s healthy and balanced for all.

  • Start your day off with a healthy, balanced breakfast.
  • Stay active during the day. Encourage your children to get their bodies moving in the morning with stretching or yoga and intersperse active breaks throughout the day. Run around outside on short school breaks. Stuck inside? Toss beanbags into laundry baskets, build a fort with blankets and pillows, grab a hula hoop, play Duck, Duck, Goose or schedule a 10-minute virtual dance party with your child’s friends after classes end and before homework begins.
  • Model healthy screen use. While increased screen time is inevitable in a world of virtual learning and social distancing, there are several ways parents can model healthy screen use and reclaim control of screen time.
    • Practice the 20-20-20 rule: For every 20 minutes in front of your screen, look at an object 20 feet away for 20 seconds before returning to your screen.
    • Blink! Studies show that eye strain increases because we don’t blink as often while we’re concentrating on our screens. Remind your child to blink often.
    • Keep your screen at arm’s length. Keeping your screen approximately 25 inches away from your eyes reduces eye strain from blue light exposure.
    • Be sure to put all of your devices to bed two hours before sleep as blue light has been shown to disrupt sleep patterns.
    • Enjoy a media-free meal each day for all family members.
    • Try instituting a device-free day each month for all family members.
  • Engage in non-screen family activities. Play board games or work on a family puzzle instead of watching TV. Take a bike ride or family walk. Have a picnic in the yard.

Whatever your schedules and challenges, Military OneSource is here to support you and your family as you improve your overall health through nutrition, physical fitness and emotional well-being.

Practicing Good Nutrition Boosts Personal Performance

Woman shopping at food market

Good healthy and peak physical fitness are key to our military community’s force readiness. One of the best ways to build strength and stamina is to eat nutritious foods that will provide your body the energy and nutrients it needs in order for you to perform at your best. Here are some tips on how to build a better diet and improve your overall well-being:

Develop and maintain healthy habits

Eating healthy usually requires developing new dietary habits, but that doesn’t have to happen overnight. Small changes over time can make a big difference. You might begin with some of these suggestions:

  • Limit your sugar. Water is essential to keep the body hydrated. Replace soda, sugary sports drinks and large quantities of juice with water.
  • Lower your sodium.  High sodium consumption can raise blood pressure, which can contribute to stroke and heart disease. Start reading labels to raise your awareness of hidden sodium. Buy reduced sodium items whenever possible.
  • Eat lean protein. Reducing fatty red meat and increasing lean proteins such as chicken, seafood, beans, eggs, nuts and seeds can aid in building muscle, losing weight and maintaining a healthy heart.
  • Choose whole grains. Whole grains are packed with protein, fiber, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. Whenever possible, eat whole grains like brown rice and whole wheat over refined grains like white bread, pasta and anything made with bleached flour.
  • Snack on fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables are an excellent source of vitamins and minerals, and their high fiber content can help you maintain a healthy gut. Replace high fat, high sodium snacks such as chips or roasted peanuts with sliced carrots or an apple.

Explore the farmers market

Not all foods are equal when it comes to nutrients. The fresher your produce is, the more nutrition it offers. Your local farmers market is a great place to shop for fresh produce at a reasonable price. Whether it’s just a roadside stand or a gathering place for local producers, these farmers markets will help you build a better diet. Find local farmers markets in the United States by searching the National Farmers Market Directory. Some of the beneftis of buying local include:

  • The food is as fresh as you’ll find anywhere. Most produce is brought to market within hours of being picked.
  • Eating food grown close to home and recently harvested has many health benefits, including increased nutrients.
  • Local farmers grow seasonal foods, which tend to be less expensive and allow you to cook seasonal dishes.
  • Farmers — your food experts — can teach you how to use the produce, grow your own food or share some great recipes.

Check out the commissary

Another great resource for eating healthy on a budget is the military commissary, which sells groceries and household goods at an average of 30% less than other markets and stores. Before your grocery run, visit the commissary website, a great network of information where you can:

  • Snag simple, healthy recipes for your meal planning or last-minute meal. Narrow your recipe search by selecting Dietitian Approved under the Browse Recipes section.
  • Review the Savings Aisle to see what’s on sale for the week and preview the promotional prices before making your shopping list.
  • Make your shopping list or order online with curbside pickup by using the My Shopping List tool.

Share your healthy lifestyle with your children

Share your nutrition goals with your children and help your family establish healthy habits that include:

  • Enjoy five or more servings of fruit and vegetables. The Mayo Clinic recommends the 1-2-3 approach — one serving of fruits or vegetables at breakfast, two servings at lunch and three servings as part of dinner or snacks throughout the day. Center your meals and snacks at home around fruits and vegetables, and teach children how to make healthy foods.
  • Serve whole grain breads and cereals that are high in fiber. Make healthier, less processed alternatives available at all meals and for snack time.
  • Encourage your children to eliminate sweetened beverages. Sweetened beverages, such as soda and sports drinks, add extra sugar and calories to the diet. Encourage children to reduce juice consumption as well. Drinking water or low-fat milk instead is a healthy choice for the entire family.

As a service member — or part of the military family — you need the right fuel to stay energized. Eating well allows you to perform your job to the best of your ability. These suggestions can get you started on a path to good nutrition and good health.

For more healthy information, check out the Military OneSource Health and Wellness Coaching program, a free resource for eligible service members and family members. My MilLife Guide is also a great way to keep your family’s health goals on target. When you sign up for My MilLife Guide as a service member or a military spouse, expert content pertaining to your goals will be delivered right to your mobile device.

Health and Wellness Coaching Consultation

Covid-19 Health and Wellness


Current as of November 16, 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has led to gym closures and disrupted other ways people stay fit and manage stress. At the same time, boredom at home can lead to unhealthy snacking. Good nutrition and fitness are key to withstanding the stress of uncertain times.

If you need a hand getting back on track, free Military OneSource health and wellness coaching can help. Coaches can also help you tackle stress and deal with life transitions.

Health and wellness coaching

Your Military OneSource health and wellness coach will work with you by phone, video or online chat to help with:

  • Weight management
  • Fitness
  • Nutrition
  • Health condition management
  • Stress management
  • Life transitions, including deployment, moving, becoming a new parent or retirement

How health and wellness coaching works

Health and wellness coaches provide information, support, encouragement and accountability. Your coach will not tell you what to do and how to do it, but will help you make a plan, focus on results and reach goals. Your coach will:

  • Help you identify your beliefs, values, vision and goals
  • Create an action plan to achieve your goals
  • Prepare you for any roadblocks or barriers to reaching your goals
  • Keep you focused and on course
  • Celebrate your achievements

Get started with health and wellness coaching

Call Military OneSource at 800-342-9647 to sign up for health and wellness coaching sessions. This service is free for service members and their immediate family.

Stay up to date on all the latest information on COVID-19. For Department of Defense updates for the military community regarding the virus that causes COVID-19, view the following sites:

Health and Wellness Coaching for Teens

Covid-19-health wellness for teens

Current as of Nov. 16, 2020

Physical activity and time with friends are essential to the health and well-being of teenagers. But the coronavirus pandemic has isolated teens and sidelined them from team sports and many other activities.

If your teen is struggling with healthy eating, physical fitness or stress, a Military OneSource health and wellness coach can help. This free service is available to those 13 and up by phone and video.

How health and wellness coaching can help

Health and wellness coaches provide information, support, encouragement and accountability for:

  • Weight management
  • Fitness
  • Nutrition
  • Health condition management
  • Stress management
  • Life transitions

How health and wellness coaching works

The health and wellness coach will guide your teenager rather than say what to do or how to do it.

The coach will:

  • Help your teenager identify goals
  • Work with your teen to create an action plan toward meeting those goals
  • Help your teen track progress toward those goals
  • Hold your teen accountable and provide support each step of the way

A parent must attend the first session with the teenager. That session will include the assessment and initial goal-setting.

Call Military OneSource at 800-342-9647 to sign your teenager up for health and wellness coaching sessions.

Stay up to date on all the latest information on COVID-19. For Department of Defense updates for the military community regarding the virus that causes COVID-19, view the following sites:

CoachHub: A Mobile Coach for Your Life

Runners at dawn

Personal trainers are good, but wouldn’t it be great if you could carry a life coach with you? Someone who would always be available to help you set goals, give you encouragement and answer your questions?

You can with CoachHub, a resilience tool from Military OneSource that gives you access to a personal online coach. It is one of several coaching solutions (Streaming YouTube is currently blocked from DOD networks. To visit the video directly, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KdgADl9Ib0A.) available to service members and their families. And unlike commercial life coaching programs, it’s free.

Contact Military OneSource 24/7.

You can get personalized help 365 days a year by telephone and online.

Overseas? See OCONUS calling options.

Prefer to live chat? Start now.

CoachHub connects you with a professional coaching expert who will motivate and help you set and track goals in areas such as exercise and physical fitness testing, nutrition, weight loss and stress reduction. You can browse and select different coaches, send messages, request appointments, and post questions. Coaches create a personal profile, manage daily tasks, and monitor progress toward your goals with your permission. You access support in the way that best suits you – by text, email or internal CoachHub messaging.

The mobile coach can be used by itself or can be integrated with MoodHacker, a resilience tool that lets you track, understand and improve your mood. Learn more here.

A personal life coach is as close as your mobile device. Sign up for CoachHub and start making your goals a reality.

Helping Family Members With Special Needs Meet Their Fitness Goals

Men in wheelchairs playing basketball

Getting in shape, eating better and exercising regularly helps us lower stress, improve self-esteem and our general well-being. Individuals with special needs share these same goals and can achieve their health and fitness goals with the help of an adaptive fitness and nutrition plan. Here are some tips to help family members with a disability meet their fitness goals:

  • Meet with a doctor or health care professional to develop a program that combines safety considerations with realistic goals. Fitness comes in all forms, and a doctor can recommend modifications for physical activities and traditional exercises to make activities more inclusive. Always follow up on a regular basis with any suggestions or concerns or to adjust the program if necessary.
  • Eat a healthy diet. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has useful information and motivational messages to keep the whole family on the path to healthy eating. If your family member has special dietary restrictions, coordinate with the doctor or nutritionist to develop a plan. The Food and Drug Administration’s “Food Allergies: What You Need to Know” can help you identify common food allergies, learn the symptoms of an allergic reaction and understand food labels to avoid potential allergens.

Take advantage of the tools and resources to track progress to achieve fitness goals.